Products You Can Use To Paint A Radiator (We get asked this a lot and we have so many options!)
Products You Can Use To Paint A Radiator (We get asked this a lot and we have so many options!)

What can I use to paint my radiator?

After “can I paint a radiator while it’s on?” This is our most asked question! 

We stock a range of products that are suitable on our website, so whatever the surface of the radiator or style you’re going for - we have you covered! When it comes down to choosing a product, there’s a few things to consider. 

All Coat

The upside:
All Coat is great for almost everything! It’s suitable for anything interior or exterior and is self priming.

Regardless of the finish (gloss, satin and matt) it’s tough and durable - with a Class 1 scrub rating, it’s as scrubbable as you can get! So if you’re in a household with small children and pets that like to get on the radiators, this could be a great choice for you!)

It’s available in 1L sizes, and we can colour match it to anything you like. Plus if you have paint left over, because it’s All Coat you could use it on plant pots, plastic/metal picture frames etc. 

The downside:

All Coat is all singing, all dancing! And if you’re only covering a small space or have a tight budget, you don’t necessarily need to go to the expense of All Coat. 

 

Fast Dry Satin/ Fast Dry Gloss/ Aqua Satin/ Aqua Gloss

The upside:
These paints are still a great choice! They’re a tough and durable range of products. However, as this paint isn’t as specialised, the price per litre is cheaper than the All Coat. (Great if you’re on a budget!)

If you’re painting your skirting boards, architrave, doors and radiators in the room the same colour then you may opt for the Leyland trim products.

The downside:
These paints require a water based undercoat application first before use. So if the radiator hasn’t been prepped for decorating previously, we recommend adding in a priming step if the radiator is bare - something like Bullseye 123 primer would do the trick! (Priming is incredibly important if the radiator is bare!). You can then apply these products on top of their respective undercoats (Fast Drying Undercoat or Aqua Undercoat). 

High Gloss/Eggshell

The upside:
This type of paint is a good choice if your radiator has previously been painted with a solvent based product, as this will save the need to apply a waterbased undercoat before starting.

The downside:
Solvent based products yellow quickly as they don’t contain the VOC’s (volatile organic compounds). Because a radiator emits heat, the yellowing process is incredibly quick! So if you’re wanting white radiators and they’re currently painted with a solvent based product, you should switch to a water based product. Yes, it means you’ll need to take the additional step of applying a waterbased undercoat first, but the long term results will be worth it! 

 

Hardwearing Acrylic Eggshell and Acrylic Durable Matt

The upside:
If you’re matching your radiator to the walls, these paints are the best way of ensuring a colour match. They both have a class 1 scrub rating, but price per litre is cheaper than All Coat.

The downside:
Both paints need the radiator to have been primed first. We recommend APU primer or the Bullseye 123.

As always, our team is on hand to answer any other questions you might have. But to conclude, in our opinion:

The best overall: All Coat

The best on a budget: Fast Dry Satin/ Fast Dry Gloss/ Aqua Satin/ Aqua Gloss

The best if you’re short of time: All Coat

The best for matching radiator and walls: Hardwearing Acrylic Eggshell and Acrylic Durable Matt

Good for previously painted radiators: High Gloss/Eggshell

Remember to let us know how your project turns out! Tag us @decoratingcentreonline  

 

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